New Video explains the future of Girls in Cub Scouts

Welcoming Girls into the Cub Scouts Video By

Patrick Sterrett

Assistant Chief Scout Executive

National Director of Field Service

https://livestream.com/bsa/nationalcouncil/videos/167216449?t=1513262188512

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Have a Scout looking for great reading? Check out the 2017 Winners of the National Outdoor Book Awards

 Outdoor Literature

 http://www.noba-web.org/books17.htm

Fly Rod of Your OwnWinner.  A Fly Rod of Your Own.  By John Gierach.  Simon and Schuster, New York.
ISBN 9781451618341

There’s no better way to bring back memories of your own fishing trips than to read of some by John Gierach.  He has a warm, inviting quality to his writing that makes him such a pleasure to read.  In honoring this book, the judges also wanted to recognize Gierach’s body of work which now totals more than 20 previous books.  His themes are simple: a favorite stream near home, a missed cast just when everything is perfect, a culinary misadventure on a trip.  With a wave of his writer’s wand, simple stories become utterly absorbing, and you find yourself captured by his magic, reading well into the night.

On TrailsWinner.  On Trails: An Exploration.  By Robert Moor.  Simon and Schuster, New York.
ISBN 9781476739236

Author Robert Moor has a thing with trails.  It’s a fascination of sorts that began on a five-month, 2,200-mile hike of the Appalachian Trail.  Those miles and miles of trail passing beneath his feet gave him plenty of time to think, and upon finishing the hike Moor set off on another journey, this one of the intellectual kind, researching the concept of trails.  His investigations quickly move him beyond the realm of hiking to the use of trails by insects, mammals and ancient humans.  Through it all, Moor’s observations on trails are fresh, thought provoking, erudite, and full of delightful surprises.

 

No BarriersHonorable Mention.  No Barriers: A Blind Man’s Journey to Kayak the Grand Canyon.  By Erik Weihenmayer and Buddy Levy.  Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press.  New York.
ISBN 9781250088789

Imagine paddling a kayak into the biggest rapid in the Grand Canyon of the Colorado.  The sound is deafening.  Mammoth waves toss your kayak about like it’s a toy.  Then imagine paddling into those waves completely blind, not knowing when the next wave is coming or from where.  Born with a rare eye disease which left him blind at the age of 13, Erik Weihenmayer takes on the rapids of the Colorado—and other adventures—in this stirring and inspiring book.  It may be a cliché, but not for Weihenmayer.  He turns the notion of impossible upside down and reveals that all is possible.

 

 

 History/Biography

Art of FreedomWinner. Art of Freedom: The Life and Climbs of Voytek Kurtyka.  By Bernadette McDonald.  Rocky Mountain Books, Vancouver, BC.
ISBN  9781771602129

In this masterpiece of a biography, Bernadette McDonald chronicles the life of Voytek Kurtyka who pushed the boundaries of mountaineering to its very limits.  He grew up in Poland and lived during a time of upheaval:  of communist domination and its eventual downfall.  Kurtyka is a reflection of those turbulent times, buying and selling on the black market to make a living, and scheming ways to outwit party bureaucrats to undertake climbing expeditions.  Known for his bold and lightning-fast ascents of big, unclimbed walls in the Himalaya, Kurtyka is a thoughtful and private individual and has largely shunned the limelight.  Fortunately, McDonald was able to conduct interviews with Kurtyka as well as undertake exhaustive research.  The result of her efforts is a work of outstanding artistry and a powerful and moving portrait of Kurtyka’s life.


 Natural History Literature

TidesWinner. Tides:  The Science and Spirit of the Ocean.  By Jonathan White.  Trinity University Press, San Antonio.  ISBN  9781595348050

The regular ebb and flow of the ocean’s tide is not easily explained—unless it is Jonathan White who’s doing the explaining.  In fact, White makes the science of tides an adventure. He takes you along as he travels the globe, seeking out the unusual and dangerous.  In Alaska’s Kalinin Bay, he struggles to save his 65-foot wooden schooner which the tides have left laying on its side in the mud.  With an Inuit hunter in northern Canada, he squeezes through a small hole into a cavity under the sea ice to gather mussels, nervously counting the minutes as the cavity begins filling with the incoming tide.  And in China, he sprints to high ground to avoid a 25-foot tidal bore barreling up a river.  White does what an excellent writer can do, lure you into an unfamiliar world, take you on adventures, change you with intriguing images and ideas.

 

 Nature and the Environment

Monarchs and MilkweedWinner. Monarchs and Milkweed.  By Anurag Agrawal.  Princeton University Press, Princeton.  ISBN 9780691166353

Who can’t admit being captivated by the monarch?  We are attracted by its beauty, of course, and by its amazing migration that can exceed 3,000 miles.  But there is something else that makes the monarch fascinating, and that is its perilous relationship with its main food source, the milkweed.  As it turns out, milkweed is toxic, and while monarchs have adapted to its toxicity, the plant is still able to marshall its defenses, killing off monarch larvae by various means.  In this colorfully illustrated work, Agrawal covers the scientific work behind this combative relationship, among which includes some of his own pioneering studies.  Monarchs and Milkweed is not only about a butterfly, but it also gives us a peek into the mind of an inventive scientist, one who clearly admires his subject and who guides us to a better understanding of this most remarkable creature.

 

Pipestone WolvesHonorable Mention.  The Pipestone Wolves:  The Rise and Fall of a Wolf Family.  By Günther Bloch.  Photography by John E. Marriott.  Rocky Mountain Books, Vancouver, BC.  ISBN  9781771601603

Some 20 years ago, a new wolf family moved into the Bow Valley of Banff National Park and ended up dominating the area for the next five years.  This book is about the investigations of two dedicated field researchers into that wolf family, and thanks to their efforts we know a great deal more about the dynamics of wolf packs and wolf families.  Later chapters deal with the eventual collapse of the Pipestone wolves and how human activity contributed to it.  Researcher and writer, Günther Bloch pulls no punches when he discusses the management of wolves and other wildlife in Banff.  It is the old dilemma of how to maintain a healthy environment for animals in the face of a growing human population.  It is hoped that, at the least, key aspects of his research will lead to management improvements.

 Classic Category

KingBird HighwayWinner.  Kingbird Highway:  The Biggest Year in the Life of an Extreme Birder.  By Kenn Kaufman. Houghton Mifflin, Boston.  ISBN 9780618709403

In January of 1972, a month shy of his 18th birthday, Kenn Kaufman left his home in Kansas and hitched a ride to Texas.  He was a high school dropout with little money and few prospects for the future.  Nevertheless, driven and single-minded, Kaufman was embarking on a quest, a quest far removed from that of a typical 18-year old.  He was out to establish the record for the most birds identified in the US in one year.  This is the story of that year-long quest:  of living on pennies a day, of hitch hiking from one end of the country to the other, and of sleeping under bridges—and yet slowly, he filled his lists with birds.  And what of his uncertain future?  He didn’t do too badly.  Have you heard of the Kaufman guides, that popular series of bird, mammal and insect guides which have sold in the thousands?  Oh yes, that’s the same Kaufman.

 

 

 Design & Artistic Merit

Wild EncountersWinner. Wild Encounters: Iconic Photographs of the World’s Vanishing Animals and Cultures.   Photography and Commentary by David Yarrow.  Rizzoli, New York. 
ISBN 9780847858323

David Yarrow is one of the virtuosos of black and white wildlife photography.  His art has graced galleries from Europe to North America.  In this large format, portfolio-sized book, you’ll be treated to some of his finest work.  Arranged by the latitude of locale, his dramatic monochromatic photographs of wild and endangered animals appear to leap from the page.  Some of the most powerful images are tightly framed close-ups in which almost every hair of the animal can be seen.  The emphasis of the book is on wildlife, but he also features people who live in close proximity with the creatures he photographs, and included among those are stunning portrayals of the Inuit in northern Canada and the stately Dinka people of the South Sudan.  You won’t be disappointed.  This is truly the work of an artist at the height of his powers.

 

 Children’s Category

Pup the Sea OtterWinner.  Pup the Sea Otter.  By Jonathan London.  Illustrated by Sean London.  WestWinds Press/Graphic Arts Books, Portland.
ISBN 978194332887

This delightful book, the work of a father and son team, is about a ball of fur called Pup.  Jonathan London tells the story of a newly born sea otter, while his son Sean, a gifted illustrator, provides color and form to the story with his tender and eye-catching paintings.   Pup grows and learns how to forage for food, all under the watchful eye of his mom.  Children will love the dialog:  slurp, slurp, slurp; munch, crunch, munch.  There’s even some danger and excitement when a shark appears, but it all turns out fine when—you guessed it—mom comes to the rescue.  For ages 4-8.

 

TreecologyHonorable Mention.  Treecology: 30 Activities and Observations for Exploring the World of Trees and Forests.  By Monica Russo.  Photographs by Kevin Byron.  Chicago Review Press, Chicago.  ISBN 9871613733967 

This wonderful learning book about trees is for budding naturalists age seven and older.  Chapters typically start with a discussion of some aspect of tree biology which, in turn, is followed by one or more hands-on activities related to the discussion.  The activities are fun and designed to help children develop their own writing, drawing and literacy skills.  It is colorful, nicely designed, and perfect for a learning adventure in a nearby woods.

 

 Instructional

Long TrailsWinner. Backpacker Long Trails:  Mastering the Art of the Thru-hike.  By Liz Thomas.  Falcon Guides, Lanham, MD.  ISBN 9871493028726

Every so often a book comes along, finds broad acceptance, and becomes the bible of a sport.  This book is destined to rise to that position among long-trail hiking guides.  Authored by Liz Thomas who has hiked the big three—Appalachian, Continental Divide and Pacific Crest—this comprehensive work is literally brimming full of practical advice for backpackers planning to spend weeks on the trail.  In addition to Thomas’s fine writing, sidebars written by other experienced hikers offer alternative ideas and strategies.  If you have a hankering to go on a long hike, there’s no question about it.  This is the one book that you’ll want to read before you go.

 

Big Walls, Swift WatersWinner.  Big Walls, Swift Waters:  Epic Stories from Yosemite Search and Rescue.  By Charles R. “Butch” Farabee.  Yosemite Conservancy, Yosemite National Park, CA.  ISBN 9781930238749

Big Walls, Swift Waters is a little bit of everything.  It’s a history, a compilation of case studies, and an instructional guide about rescue equipment and techniques.  Well illustrated with photographs from past rescues, author Charles “Butch” Farabee documents many of the classic search and rescues that have occurred in Yosemite National Park.  It’s a fascinating, insider’s view of rescue, and you’ll find yourself rappelling out of helicopters, hanging on granite walls, and plunging into icy waters.

 

 

 Nature Guidebooks

Scout's Guide to Wild EdiblesWinner.  The Scout’s Guide to Wild Edibles.  By Mike Krebill.  St. Lynn’s Press, Pittsburg.
ISBN  9781943366064

Sometimes good guidebooks come in small packages.  The Scout’s Guide to Wild Edibles almost fits in a back pocket, and yet, for its relatively small size, it packs in a lot of information.  Author Mike Krebill knows his wild edibles, and he knows how to make a guidebook fun for young people.  A wild food expert and a Scout leader, he divides the book into two parts:  the first is the identification guide profiling 40 widely found edible wild plants and mushrooms.  The second half consists of recipes and ways of cooking wild foods.  In this last half boys and girls are pictured preparing and cooking plants that they have gathered on their outdoor forays.  It’s oriented to the younger set, of course, but adults just might want to sneak one along on the next outing.  They’ll find it pretty handy too.

 

Butterflies of PennsylvaniaWinner.  Butterflies of Pennsylvania:  A Field Guide.  By James L. Monroe and David M. Wright.  University of Pittsburg Press, Pittsburg. 
ISBN 9780822964551

Butterflies of Pennsylvania is one of those guidebooks that sets out with a purpose and ends up doing it well.  What appealed to the judges is that all of the information on a butterfly species is covered on a single page or a two-page spread.  There’s no need to look elsewhere for maps and other information.  The photos are crisp.  The text is clear, and the maps and charts easy to use.  If you live in Pennsylvania or in surrounding states, this fine guidebook is a must-have.

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 Outdoor Adventure Guidebooks

Outdoor Adventures Acadia National ParkWinner.  Outdoor Adventures, Acadia National Park: Your Guide to the Best Hiking, Biking and Paddling.  By Jerry and Marcy Monkman.  Appalachian Mountain Club, Boston. 
ISBN 9781628420579

Situated along the rugged coastline of Maine, Acadia National Park is truly a Northeast treasure.  It’s the oldest designated national park area east of the Mississippi River and has a little of everything:  125 miles of hiking trails, 45 miles of historic carriage roads, rocky mountains, ponds, islands and dense evergreen forests.  One of the best ways to enjoy it is with this guidebook by Jerry and Marcy Monkman.  The Monkman’s are accomplished Eastern writers and photographers, and in this guide, they have detailed 50 choice hiking, biking and paddling trips.  There’s even a two-sided 20” x 25” full color map which can be removed from the back cover and which shows all of the routes covered in the book.

“That ain’t work’n!”

November Roundtable is this coming Thursday, November 2.  In the past we called this the Fireside Chat were we told you what we were going to do.

“That ain’t work’n!”

What we need to know is what YOU want us to do. What are we doing wrong? What do we need to improve? How can we help you? How can we make Scouting better in the Timberline District? What needs to be done on the Council level?

This will be your opportunity to speak to the Timberline Key 3, Steve Yexley, Dana Smerchek and myself along with the Timberline Professionals, Cheyann Thunberg and Tim Purvis. No holds barred, no need to worry, we see this as a way for all of us to get better.

If you have a complaint, let us know. If you need something, let us know. If you think we are messing up, let us know.  Whatever the issue at whatever level in Scouting, let us know!

This will not be you say something and we spend 20 minutes why we are not right. This will be you say something and we write it down.  We learn so we can improve.

Of all the meetings I’ve had since accepting this position, last years “Fireside Chat” was the most informative and the most productive. We changed our direction and focus as a District Committee because of that meeting. We think we are getting better, however we need your feedback to know for sure.

Please come and let us know what we can do to help Timberline District get better, help us learn how we can help you help the youth in our district.

7:00 PM

LDS Church 9227 W Dartmouth Pl, Lakewood, CO 80227

I look forward to seeing you all there.

Jim Moss

Timberline District Chair

Denver Area Council

BSA.Rec.Law@gmail.com

720 334 8529

Timberline District Webpage:  https://timberline-district-bsa.org/

Timberline District Calendar:   https://timberline-district-bsa.org/calendar/

BSA Expands Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts Programs to Welcome Girls

Denver Area Council, Boy Scouts of America
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BSA Expands Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts Programs to Welcome Girls

Today, the Boy Scouts of America Board of Directors unanimously approved to welcome girls into its iconic Cub Scout program and to deliver a Scouting program for older girls that will enable them to advance and earn the highest rank of Eagle Scout.

Starting in the 2018 program year in August, families can choose to sign up their sons and daughters for Cub Scouts. Existing packs may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remain an all-boy pack. Cub Scout dens will be single-gender — all boys or all girls.

Using the same curriculum as the Boy Scouts program, the organization will also deliver a program for older girls, which will be announced in 2018 and projected to be available in 2019, that will enable them to earn the Eagle Scout rank. This unique approach allows the organization to maintain the integrity of the single gender model while also meeting the needs of today’s families.

The historic decision comes after years of receiving requests from families and girls. The BSA evaluated the results of numerous research efforts, gaining input from current members and leaders – as well as parents and girls who have never been involved in Scouting – to understand how to offer families an important additional choice in meeting the character development needs of all their children.

The BSA has provided programing to young women and young men for many years through Sea Scouts, STEM Scouts, Exploring and Venturing:

  • STEM Scouts: 40% of participants are girls/young women, 60% are boys/young men
  • Exploring: 39% of participants are girls/young women, 61% are boys/young men
  • Venturing; 23% of participants are girls/young women, 77% are boys/young men
  • Sea Scouts: 40% of participants are girls/young women, 60% are boys/young men

National BSA shared a press release and link to a Frequently Asked Questions file regarding the expansion of Scouting programs to include girls on Scouting Newsroom here: http://www.scoutingnewsroom.org/family-scouting)

Wild Wild West Cub-O-Ree & Campout at Magness Adventure Camp

Denver Area Council, Boy Scouts of America
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Hi there! Cub-O-Ree will be held September 23-24 at Magness Adventure Camp. Cub Scout families of all ages are welcome, including siblings and parents. The weekend will have a western theme, and include activities like BB Guns, Archery, an Indian Village, crafts, and earning adventure badges!

The early registration cost is $35 for a Parent and Cub. Each additional adult costs $20, while additional youth (cubs or siblings) cost $15. Food is included.

What is Cub Scout Cub-O-Ree?
Two days and one night of fun and activities for Cub Scouts and their parents or supervising adults. Programs and activities are provided by trained Program staff. The Boy Scout Order of the Arrow is leading this event and staff will come from OA and other Boy Scout adults and youth. The Order of the Arrow (OA) is the National Honor Society of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) and was created to honor Scouts that best exemplify the Scout Oath and Law.

Download the Flyer Here For All The Details

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Boy Scouts of America, Denver Area Council
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Phone: 303.455.5522 | En Espanol: 720.266.2114 | Fax: 303.455.4689
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How Cub Scouts and others in the fourth grade can get into national parks free

Original Article can be found here.

It’s settled. Fourth-graders are officially the coolest kids in school.

They’re the beneficiaries of a federal program that grants free access to national parks, lands and waters.

Thanks to the Department of the Interior’s Every Kid in a Park program, started in 2015, fourth-graders and their families can get free entry into these public lands for a full year.

The year of free access aligns with the school year — Sept. 1 to Aug. 31. The passes can be requested and printed online.

The three-step method

Step 1: Get the pass. Get and print fourth-grade passes to our national lands and waters.

Step 2: Plan a trip. With input from their parent or guardian, fourth-graders plan a fun place to visit. There may be an opportunity to complete Cub Scout adventures along the way.

Step 3: Hit the road. A full year to explore national parks, lands and waters seems like a long time, but it’ll be gone in a flash. Speaking of flashes: remember to take only pictures and leave only footprints.

Things to know

  • Electronic copies of the pass aren’t accepted, so you’ll need to bring a printed copy with you.
  • Each pass has a unique code, so you can’t copy it and share it with friends.
  • The pass is accepted at Forest Service, National Park Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Bureau of Reclamation areas.
  • If you visit a site that charges entrance fees per person, the pass admits all children under 16 and up to three adults for free.
  • If your group visits a site that charges vehicle entrance fees, the pass admits all children under 16 and all adults in up to one passenger vehicle. Commercial vehicles can’t use a pass to get in.
  • If you arrive at a site on bicycle, the pass admits all children under 16 and up to three adults on bicycles.
  • The pass doesn’t cover things like parking fees, camping, boats and special tours. Also, some sites are managed by private operators. They may not honor the pass. Check with the site ahead of time to find out. The pass doesn’t cover fees for local, city, or state parks and recreation areas unless they say that they accept this pass.

Did you Know there was a Patch you Can Earn for Understanding the Upcoming Solar Eclipse.

Diana Shafer has prepared and submitted workbooks to the USSSP for Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts to use to document their work toward earning this special patch. I’ve added one for Venturers and Sea Scouts.

I’ve uploaded the workbooks to our website, and they can be downloaded by following these links:

* Workbook for Cub Scouts
DOCX format
PDF Format
* Workbook for Boy Scouts, and Varsity Scouts
DOCX format
PDF Format

There are also links to the workbooks on the following USSSP web page:

http://usscouts.org/advancementTOC.asp